Aronofsky's “Noah” sparks controversy among Christian, Jewish audiences

Aronofsky's “Noah” sparks controversy among Christian, Jewish audiences

PanARMENIAN.Net - Darren Aronofsky's Noah has sparked controversy among test audiences, Digital Spy said.

The upcoming biblical epic, which stars Russell Crowe as Noah and Emma Watson as his adopted daughter Ila, has been screened to "key groups" with an interest in the subject matter, including a largely Jewish audience in New York, a largely Christian audience in Arizona and a general screening in California.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, all three screenings have generated "troubling reactions", prompting Paramount to request changes from Aronofsky.

It is unclear whether Aronofsky has retained his right to final cut on the film, or whether this has been removed in light of the poor feedback, but the director is reportedly resistant to the changes suggested.

Among the studio's reported concerns are the film's extensive use of visual effects, and the challenge of creating a third act that will not alienate Christian audiences.

Paramount vice chairman Rob Moore said that the preview process is standard and that the studio had intentionally allowed for "a very long post-production period, which allowed for a lot of test screenings".

Moore is also quoted as saying that Aronofsky wants "some level of independence" but "also wants a hit movie", concluding: "We're getting to a very good place, and we're getting there with Darren."

Sir Anthony Hopkins, Jennifer Connelly, Douglas Booth, Logan Lerman and Ray Winstone are also among the cast of Noah, which will be released on March 28, 2014.

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