Android app to use artificial intelligence to spot malware

Android app to use artificial intelligence to spot malware

PanARMENIAN.Net - A securtiy startup called Zimperium has launched mobile software that learns from smartphones to fend off malicious cyber attacks, The Inquirer reports.

Claiming to be the first security software to be powered by artificial intelligence (AI), the app is called zIPS, with the "IPS" standing for "intrusion prevention system". The aim of the AI is to better spot malware before it causes harm or spreads to other devices.

The zIPS software works whether the smartphone is offline or online and can protect against malicious apps, such as those that can self-modify, and network attacks like a "man in the middle" attack where a hacker intercepts data being sent between one user and another, according to The Inquirer.

"With zIPS, corporations will now have the opportunity to use [bring your own device] as an advantage to their security. zIPS is the first security solution that can combat modern cyber-attacks on mobile," said Zimperium's founder and CEO Zuk Avraham. "There is already evidence of attacks that are happening to infiltrate organizations, which only zIPS can prevent."

Prior to working on the Android app, Avraham worked as a security researcher for the Israeli Defense Forces and Samsung electronics before setting up Zimperium in response to what he thinks is a poor selection of good mobile security software.

According to MIT Technology Review, Zimperium said that there have as yet been no programs that can detect, notify and protect against cyber attacks deployed through mobile devices.

The zIPS Android app has arrived in the Google Play store for all Android devices at a time when malware on Android is at an all time high, The Inquirer says.

Last year, Trend Micro warned that Google's Android mobile operating system is so beset by cyber criminals creating malicious apps that the malware was on track to hit the million mark before the end of 2013.

The firm said that this was attributable to hackers seeking to exploit Android's growing global user base.

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