“Orphan Black” sci-fi, “Call Me Fitz” comedy top Canadian Screen Awards

“Orphan Black” sci-fi, “Call Me Fitz” comedy top Canadian Screen Awards

PanARMENIAN.Net - The sci-fi drama Orphan Black on Sunday, March 9 completed its sweep of the Canadian Screen Awards. The Space and BBC America clone thriller won for best drama and best dramatic actress for lead Tatiana Maslany, The Hollywood Reporter said.

The two latest trophies for Orphan Black, coming during a kudosfest hosted by Martin Short and airing on the CBC, were added to the eight pre-telecast awards already earned by the Canadian sci-fi series.

The drama, which sees Maslany play seven look-alike characters, came into the Canadian Screen Awards' TV competition with a field-leading 14 nominations.

Also on the TV front, the Canadian pay TV drama Call Me Fitz was named best comedy, while also earning Jason Priestley the best comedic actor trophy and co-lead Tracy Dawson the best comedic actress prize.

The best dramatic TV actor prize went to Hugh Dillon for his star turn in the cop drama Flashpoint.

On the film front, Denis Villeneuve's Enemy, which stars Jake Gyllenhaal, shared the spotlight with The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones, the adaptation of Cassandra Clare's best-selling YA book, with each feature snagging five trophies.

Enemy won trophies for best direction for Villeneuve, best cinematography, editing and original score, as well as earning Sarah Gadon the best supporting film actress prize.

The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones picked up the Golden Reel Award for being the Canadian film with the biggest domestic box office at $5.2 million last year.

The film's producer, Don Carmody, has earned eight Golden Reel awards for his films over the years.

The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones, which starred Lily Collins, also picked up Screenies for best overall sound, sound editing, visual effects and makeup.

On the acting side, Gabrielle Marion-Rivard won the best actress prize for her star turn in Gabrielle, Gabriel Arcand won for best actor for his lead role in Le Demantelement, and Gordon Pinsent was named best supporting actor for his role in The Grand Seduction.

Another highlight of the second annual Canadian Screen Awards was David Cronenberg receiving a lifetime achievement award from Viggo Mortensen.

Mortensen singled the Academy Awards out for never nominating Cronenberg, despite a 40-year career as a movie director.

"Mainstream movie business people, much as they might praise him (Cronenberg) time to time, seem very reluctant to reward him officially. I can understand that because David basically is not one of them. And I think they know it — a fact that probably makes them even more uncomfortable than his movies do," Mortensen, who was directed by Cronenberg in A History of Violence, Eastern Promises and A Dangerous Method, said.

 Top stories
The first film, “I Left My Shoes in Istanbul,” closely follows the journey of a Lebanese-Armenian modernist poet.
Over the past two years, “Orphans of the Genocide” has been broadcast on PBS stations nationwide, reaching over 12 million viewers.
The other exhibition, Arshile Gorky and the Collection is at the Foundation’s Modern Art Centre, and runs until May 31, 2015.
Fittingly, Narek Hakhnazaryan performs Tchaikovsky’s Variations on a Rococo Theme in this debut tour with the NZSO.
Partner news