U.S. envoy, Turkey's AKP rep. discuss Armenian Genocide resolution

U.S. envoy, Turkey's AKP rep. discuss Armenian Genocide resolution

PanARMENIAN.Net - U.S. ambassador to Turkey Francis Ricciardone and Justice and Development Party (AKP) Deputy Head Mehmet Ali Sahin discussed the U.S. Senate committee's adopting of the Armenian Genocide Resolution, TRT Haber said.

The latest developments in Syria, Iraq, Iran, Cyprus, Palestine, Israel, Ukraine, and Turkey-U.S. relations were also on the meeting agenda.

"'We both agreed on the importance of keeping Turkish-American relations in a high level," Ricciardone told journalists after the meeting.

For the first time in nearly a quarter century, a U.S. Senate committee on April 10, adopted an Armenian Genocide Resolution, calling upon the Senate to commemorate this crime and encouraging the President to ensure that America’s foreign policy reflects and reinforces the lessons, documented in the U.S. record, of the still-unpunished genocide.

With a vote of 12 to 5, the Committee voted to condemn and commemorate the Armenian Genocide.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Robert Menendez (D-NJ) spearheaded the effort to have this influential foreign policy panel speak clearly regarding the Ottoman Turkish Government’s centrally planned and systematically carried out campaign of genocide from 1915-1923, which resulted in the deaths of over 1.5 million men, women and children.

The Armenian Genocide resolution

The resolution affirming the U.S. record on the Armenian Genocide (H.Res.252) was formally introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Reps. Adam Schiff (D.-CA), George Radanovich (R.-CA), Frank Pallone, Jr. (D.-NJ), and Mark Kirk (R.-Ill). On March 4, 2010 it was adopted with a 22-21 vote by the House Committee on Foreign Relations. A similar resolution was introduced in the Senate.

The Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide (1915-23) was the deliberate and systematic destruction of the Armenian population of the Ottoman Empire during and just after World War I. It was characterized by massacres, and deportations involving forced marches under conditions designed to lead to the death of the deportees, with the total number of deaths reaching 1.5 million.

The majority of Armenian Diaspora communities were formed by the Genocide survivors.

Present-day Turkey denies the fact of the Armenian Genocide, justifying the atrocities as “deportation to secure Armenians”. Only a few Turkish intellectuals, including Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk and scholar Taner Akcam, speak openly about the necessity to recognize this crime against humanity.

The Armenian Genocide was recognized by Uruguay, Russia, France, Lithuania, the Italian Chamber of Deputies, majority of U.S. states, parliaments of Greece, Cyprus, Argentina, Belgium and Wales, National Council of Switzerland, Chamber of Commons of Canada, Polish Sejm, Vatican, European Parliament and the World Council of Churches.

 Top stories
Organized by the Hrant Dink Foundation, the conference aimed to address the policy of closed borders and its aspects.
Members of Congress joined with Armenian American organizations in welcoming the display of the Armenian Orphan Rug.
“Turkey is willing to have good relations with all neighbor states and always supported the interests of Azerbaijan,” Bagli said.
Mardirossian has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Near East Foundation since 2002 and its Chair since 2007.
Partner news