“Monstrumologist” horror book series gets film treatment at Warner Bros.

“Monstrumologist” horror book series gets film treatment at Warner Bros.

PanARMENIAN.Net - Warner Bros. is looking for monsters, picking up movie rights to Rick Yancey’s four-book “Monstrumologist” series, Variety reported.

“Monstrumoligist” has been set up with Gotham Group’s Ellen Goldsmith Vein and State Street’s Bob Teitel. Exec producers are Eric Robinson at Gotham Group and George Tillman, Jr. at State Street.

The studio has hired Jessica Postigo to adapt the script. Her credits include “Mortal Instruments: the City of Bones.”

Newly hired senior VP Drew Crevello and creative exec Jon Gonda are overseeing for the studio

The young-adult horror story centers on Dr. Pellinore Warthrop and his assistant Will Henry. Will is an orphan under the care of Dr. Warthrop, who studies dangerous creatures and monsters. The story is set in 1888, launching with a nightmarish specimen carted to the monstrumologist’s home — an anthropuphagi, a vicious man-eating creature without a head.

“The Monstrumologist” launched in 2009 followed by “The Curse of the Wendigo” (2010), “The Isle of Blood” (2011) and “The Final Descent” (2013).

Gotham Group has four upcoming films, including dark comedy “Life of Crime,” starring Jennifer Aniston, from Lionsgate; sci-fier “The Maze Runner” at Fox; “No Good Deed” at Screen Gems; and “Camp XRay” from IFC.

Teitel is working on a reboot of the “Barbershop” franchise for MGM.

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