Venice Film Fest poster pays tribute to Francois Truffaut's “The 400 Blows”

Venice Film Fest poster pays tribute to Francois Truffaut's “The 400 Blows”

PanARMENIAN.Net - The Venice Film Festival will pay tribute to Francois Truffaut's The 400 Blows (Les quatre cents coups) with its poster for the 71st edition, The Hollywood Reporter said.

The poster for the August festival is hotly anticipated every year. This year's version, drawn for the third consecutive year by artist and film director Simone Massi, is inspired by the classic closing sequence of Truffaut's acclaimed 1959 crime drama.

The boy in the poster was played in the film by Jean-Pierre Leaud, who was 14 at the time the film was shot.

The 400 Blows, which won Truffaut a Best Director award in Cannes in 1959, was nominated for an Oscar for Best Screenplay for the work of Truffaut and co-writer Marcel Moussy.

Massi is also the creator of the 30-second opening sequence shown before each screening in Venice's official selection since 2012. The sequence uses 300 hand-drawn illustrations inspired by iconic film directors ranging from Federico Fellini to Wim Wenders.

Massi, 44, has won more than 200 awards for his work, including a David di Donatello prize for Best Short Film two years ago.

The Venice festival, the world's oldest film event, will take place this year August 27-Sept. 6.

 Top stories
Other Armenian artists due to perform during Midem include the State Youth Orchestra of Armenia, conducted by Sergey Smbatyan.
“1915” will open in select theaters across Southern California on April 17, in New York City on April 22, and in Yerevan on April 25.
UCLA is also home to the Armenian Music Program, with a course taught by Vatsche Barsoumian and an Armenian Music Ensemble.
Titled “With you, Armenia,” the concert at the Henry Crown Hall will feature works by Komitas, Stepan Rostomyan and others.
Partner news
Aznavour: The Legend Returns

“The voice of a seemingly extinct volcano which sings to your heart, rather than ears..is heard throughout the world,” Aznavour’s biographer Yves Salgues wrote.