Samsung unveils new smartphone with metal frame

Samsung unveils new smartphone with metal frame

PanARMENIAN.Net - Samsung has announced a new smartphone with a metal frame that is smaller and thinner than its flagship model, BBC News reports.

The South Korean company describes the Galaxy Alpha as representing a "new design approach".

The firm has previously been criticized for the plastic feel of its handsets at a time when other firms have opted to use materials marketed as having a "premium" feel.

Samsung Electronics saw a 20% year-on-year drop in its last quarter's profit. It blamed "slow global sales of smartphones".

The company recently lost its status as China's bestselling smartphone-maker to Xiaomi, a local rival, according to the research group Canalys.

Xiaomi's latest handset, the Mi 4, also features a metal-framed build.

The new handset has a 4.7in (11.9cm) screen, making it slightly smaller than the Galaxy S5.

Its camera also has a lower specification of 12 megapixels, but it benefits from being nearly a fifth slimmer, measuring 6.7mm (0.26in) deep, and is also lighter, weighing in at 114g (4oz).

Samsung replaced the head of its mobile design team in May, when Lee Min-hyouk took over the role from Chang Dong-hoon.

The move followed several reviews that had praised the Galaxy S5's capabilities while criticizing its feel.

Other manufacturers that had already shifted to offering part or full-metal bodied phones at the time included HTC, Huawei, Apple and Sony.

A spokeswoman for Samsung said it would announce the device's price and shipping date at a later stage.

The company is expected to unveil the Galaxy Note 4, its latest large "phablet" handset, in Berlin on Sept 3 ahead of the start of the Ifa tech show.

 Top stories
The attacks appear unrelated to an episode in which hackers stole nude photos from the iCloud accounts of several U.S. celebrities.
"We roughly know who they are. If we can take them out of the equation then the rest will fall down," Troels Oerting said.
Facebook, like Twitter and YouTube, is inaccessible in Iran on the grounds that the sites undermine Islamic values.
The firm said it brought the case in an effort to force the government to be more transparent about personal data requests.
Partner news