Good Films nabs “Short Skin” ahead of Venice Fest premiere

Good Films nabs “Short Skin” ahead of Venice Fest premiere

PanARMENIAN.Net - Indie distributor Good Films will handle the Italian release of “Short Skin”. Films Boutique has acquired for international sales for the feature, Variety said.

Lead produced by Tuscany’s La Regle du Jeu in an unusual three-way Italy-Iran-U.K. co-production, “Short Skin” is backed by the Biennale College Cinema, a joint venture of the Venice Festival and fashion house Gucci.

The movie is Italian director Duccio Chiarini’s fiction debut, which he also produced with Babak Jalali. It turns on Edoardo, a 17-year-old whose medical malformation prevents him from experiencing sexual satisfaction.

Forced by his own fears and insecurities into a shell that isolates him from girls, Edoardo develops other skills that help him better understand women and the “endless contradictions of feelings his situation has built up within him,” said Chiarini.

“The idea of the film is to tell the frailties and weaknesses of the male sex, too often represented by exclusive references to machismo,” he added.

“Short Skin” world premieres Saturday, August 28 at the Venice Festival.

A classic arthouse distributor, Good Films’ recent acquisitions range from Richard Linklater’s “Before Midnight” to Olivier Assayas’ “Clouds of Sils Maria,” Xavier Dolan’s “Mommy” and Lars von Trier’s “Nymphomaniac: Vol. 1.”

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