// IP Marketing video - START// IP Marketing video - END

Georgia dethrones Armenia and Iran as oldest-ever wine producer

Georgia dethrones Armenia and Iran as oldest-ever wine producer

PanARMENIAN.Net - Scientists say 8,000-year-old pottery fragments have revealed the earliest evidence of grape wine-making.

The earthenware jars containing residual wine compounds were found in two sites south of the Georgian capital, Tbilisi, researchers said, according to BBC.

A 6100-year old winary was unearthed in Armenia back in 2011 when a wine press and fermentation jars were discovered in a cave in Vayots Dzor province.

Previously, the earliest evidence of grape wine-making had been found in the Zagros Mountains of Iran and dated to 5,400-5,000 BC.

Some of the jars bore images of grape clusters and a man dancing.

Previously, the earliest evidence of wine-making was from pottery dating from about 7,000 years ago found in north-western Iran.

The latest finds were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

"We believe this is the oldest example of the domestication of a wild-growing Eurasian grapevine solely for the production of wine," said co-author Stephen Batiuk, a senior researcher at the University of Toronto.

"Wine is central to civilisation as we know it in the West. As a medicine, social lubricant, mind-altering substance and highly valued commodity, wine became the focus of religious cults, pharmacopoeias, cuisines, economies and society in the ancient Near East."

The pottery jars were discovered in two Neolithic villages, called Gadachrili Gora and Shulaveris Gora, about 50km (30 miles) south of Tbilisi, researchers said.

Telltale chemical signs of wine were discovered in eight jars, the oldest one dating from about 5,980 BC.

 Top stories
Cartisan will design and publish a brand new 1:25,000-scale topographical hiking map of Armenia's beautiful Dilijan National Park.
Yerevan is a small capital compared to many European cities, which means people from all walks of life co-exist within a small space.
The Aurora Initiative announced the end of the nomination period for the prestigious Aurora Prize for Awakening Humanity.
70-year-old Petik Hakobyan has been found cultivating cannabis in his greenhouse in the Armenian village of Hovtamej, the police said.
Partner news