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Georgia should offer Russia, Europe and U.S. to come to geopolitical compromise

PanARMENIAN.Net - Some people in Georgia erroneously think that joining NATO will resolve all problems, Georgian political scientist Joumber Kirvalidze said.



"Actually, we will immediately undertake the problems Americans experience in Iraq, Afghanistan and Iran and will immediately become a target for Islamic fundamentalists. Thanks to our wise ancestor, Muslims respect us as noble and courageous nation," he said.



"Nevertheless, I think that Georgia should not dispatch forces to Islamic states, no matter who patrons peacekeeping operations. We should remember that the Islamic world surrounds us. Those who attempt to alienate Georgia and Russia are imposing a fatal game on us. Some "farseeing" politicians suppose that Russia will decline soon and the issue of autonomies will be resolved in our favor."



Russia's policy is Achilles' heel for Georgian politicians, according to Kirvalidze. "Those wishing Georgia welfare should alleviate tensions. Some figures trying to get dividends from the U.S.-Russia confrontation are far from being politicians. I am surprised to hear some intellectuals saying that Russia is a hostile country. The fact is that Russian intelligentsia treats us just the opposite way," he said.



"To re-unite Georgia we should offer Russia, Europe and U.S. to come to geopolitical compromise on the basis of the international law," Kirvalidze said, Free Georgia reports.
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