Davutoğlu says measures taken against ‘initiatives bothering Turkey’

Davutoğlu says measures taken against ‘initiatives bothering Turkey’

PanARMENIAN.Net - Several hours before the adoption of the Armenian Genocide Resolution by the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee, journalists questioned State Department Press Spokesperson Jen Psaki regarding the Obama Administration's position on the resolution and pending Committee consideration.

"Well, our position has long been that we acknowledge – clearly acknowledge as historical fact and mourn the loss of 1.5 million Armenians who were massacred or marched to their deaths in the final days of the Ottoman Empire. These horrific events resulted in one of the worst atrocities of the 20th century, and the United States recognizes that they remain a great source of pain for the people of Armenia and of Armenian descent, as they do for all of us who share basic universal values. Beyond that, I don’t have any other comment for you," Psaki replied.

Despite repeated queries, she stopped short of the State Department's traditional practice of openly arguing against the adoption of Armenian Genocide legislation.

Meanwhile, according to the Hurriyet Daily News, Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu held a phone conversation with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry prior to the committee vote, to discuss the document.

The Turkish government is taking measures against “initiatives that will bother Turkey,” he said.

The Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide (1915-23) was the deliberate and systematic destruction of the Armenian population of the Ottoman Empire during and just after World War I. It was characterized by massacres, and deportations involving forced marches under conditions designed to lead to the death of the deportees, with the total number of deaths reaching 1.5 million.

The majority of Armenian Diaspora communities were formed by the Genocide survivors.

Present-day Turkey denies the fact of the Armenian Genocide, justifying the atrocities as “deportation to secure Armenians”. Only a few Turkish intellectuals, including Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk and scholar Taner Akcam, speak openly about the necessity to recognize this crime against humanity.

The Armenian Genocide was recognized by Uruguay, Russia, France, Lithuania, the Italian Chamber of Deputies, majority of U.S. states, parliaments of Greece, Cyprus, Argentina, Belgium and Wales, National Council of Switzerland, Chamber of Commons of Canada, Polish Sejm, Vatican, European Parliament and the World Council of Churches.

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