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Germany's Rhineland-Palatinate parliament adopts Genocide resolution

Germany's Rhineland-Palatinate parliament adopts Genocide resolution

PanARMENIAN.Net - On the occasion of the Armenian Genocide centennial, the parliament of the federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, on Tuesday, May 12 adopted a joint resolution condemning the genocide.

In the Rhineland-Palatinate capital city of Mainz, all parliamentary groups used the term Genocide to describe what occurred in the Ottoman Empire in 1915, Public Radio of Armenia reports, citing Die Welt.

“Our common goal must be to contribute to reconciliation, understanding and awareness,” the speakers said.

“This is not solely about remembering the victims, but also the need to look ahead. Our joint objective is to achieve reconciliation, mutual understanding, and recognition. That is why we support the development of Armenian-Turkish relations.”

The parliamentary groups call on the Rhineland-Palatinate state government to promote initiatives and projects to address the events of 1915-16 and the German co-responsibility.

The resolution calls to remember the Armenian Genocide that occurred 100 years ago. The [Rhineland-Palatinate] parliament groups condemn the Ottoman Empire’s actions that led to the extermination of 1.5 million Armenians.

The Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide (1915-23) was the deliberate and systematic destruction of the Armenian population of the Ottoman Empire during and just after World War I. It was characterized by massacres and deportations, involving forced marches under conditions designed to lead to the death of the deportees, with the total number of deaths reaching 1.5 million.

The majority of Armenian Diaspora communities were formed by the Genocide survivors.

Present-day Turkey denies the fact of the Armenian Genocide, justifying the atrocities as “deportation to secure Armenians”. Only a few Turkish intellectuals, including Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk and scholar Taner Akcam, speak openly about the necessity to recognize this crime against humanity.

The Armenian Genocide was recognized by Uruguay, Russia, France, Lithuania, Italy, 45 U.S. states, Greece, Cyprus, Lebanon, Argentina, Belgium, Austria, Wales, Switzerland, Canada, Poland, Venezuela, Chile, Bolivia, the Vatican, Luxembourg, Brazil, Germany, the Netherlands, Paraguay, Sweden, Venezuela, Slovakia, Syria, Vatican, as well as the European Parliament and the World Council of Churches.

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