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Billboard displays Fridtjof Nansen's message of peace in Massachusetts

Billboard displays Fridtjof Nansen's message of peace in Massachusetts

PanARMENIAN.Net - During the months of March and April, Peace of Art Inc. continues its 2017 campaign in commemoration of the 102nd anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, by posting seven digital billboards on busy highways in the state of Massachusetts, calling on the international community to recognize the first genocide of the 20th century, the Armenian Genocide.

Peace of Art Inc.'s president and founder, artist Daniel Varoujan Hejinian, stated that, in March 2017 Peace of Art, Inc. posted seven digital billboards in Massachusetts. In April, Peace of Art Inc., posted the 8th digital billboard with a new theme with two rotating digital screens, in Wrentham, Massachusetts. The first screen honors the memory of the victims of the Holocaust and all genocides worldwide, with the image of the leaders of the Catholic and the Armenian Apostolic Churches sending a message of peace to Turkey to recognize the Armenian genocide. The second screen displays Fridtjof Nansen's message of peace, "If nations could (...) settle their possible differences, they would easily be able to establish a lasting peace." Similar stationary and digital billboards are also on display in New Britain, Connecticut and Cleveland, Ohio.

Peace of Art, Inc. is a non-profit educational organization registered with the Massachusetts Secretary of State, and tax exempt under section 501. Founded in 2003 by the artist Daniel Varoujan Hejinian, Peace of Art Inc., uses art as an educational tool to bring awareness to the universal human condition and promote peaceful solutions to conflict. Peace of Art, Inc., is not associated with political or religious organizations, and it is focused on the global human condition. Peace of Art Inc., is dedicated to the peace keepers and peace achievers around the world, and those who had the courage to place themselves on the line for the betterment of humanity.

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