Montenegro ceremony pays tribute to Armenian Genocide victims

Montenegro ceremony pays tribute to Armenian Genocide victims

PanARMENIAN.Net - A commemoration ceremony was held in the town of Budva in Montenegro to honor the memory of 1.5 million victims of the Armenian Genocide perpetrated by the Ottoman Empire.

At the initiative of the Armenian community of Montenegro, a mass was served at Surb Astvatsatsin Armenian church near Budva, the Armenian foreign ministry reports.

Local Armenians and Serbs, Montenegrins, Germans, Russians, Ukrainians and Chechens took part in the service.

102 years have passed since the beginning of the Armenian Genocide, perpetrated in the Ottoman Empire between 1915 and 1923.

The Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide (1915-23) was the deliberate and systematic destruction of the Armenian population of the Ottoman Empire during and just after World War I. It was characterized by massacres and deportations, involving forced marches under conditions designed to lead to the death of the deportees, with the total number of deaths reaching 1.5 million.

The majority of Armenian Diaspora communities were formed by the Genocide survivors.

Present-day Turkey denies the fact of the Armenian Genocide, justifying the atrocities as “deportation to secure Armenians”. Only a few Turkish intellectuals, including Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk and scholar Taner Akcam, speak openly about the necessity to recognize this crime against humanity.

The Armenian Genocide was recognized by Uruguay, Russia, France, Lithuania, Italy, 45 U.S. states, Greece, Cyprus, Lebanon, Argentina, Belgium, Austria, Wales, Switzerland, Canada, Poland, Venezuela, Chile, Bolivia, the Vatican, Luxembourg, Brazil, Germany, the Netherlands, Paraguay, Sweden, Venezuela, Slovakia, Syria, Vatican, as well as the European Parliament and the World Council of Churches.

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