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World Without Genocide honors Turkish scholar Taner Akcam

World Without Genocide honors Turkish scholar Taner Akcam

PanARMENIAN.Net - Clark University history professor Taner Akcam who is among the Turkish intellectuals who recognize the Armenian Genocide will be honored with the 2018 Outstanding Upstander Award from the World Without Genocide organization for his work promoting justice and the rule of law.

He will formally receive the award at the organization’s annual gala in May of 2018 in Minneapolis.

Akcam is one of the first Turkish intellectuals to openly discuss the Armenian Genocide, he holds the only endowed chair dedicated to research and teaching on this subject.

Akcam is an outspoken advocate of democracy and free expression since his student days at Middle East Technical University in Ankara, he is an internationally recognized human rights activist.

Previous recipients of the World Without Genocide award include Eli Rosenbaum, Director of Human Rights Enforcement Strategy and Policy at the U.S. Department of Justice; Claudia Paz y Paz, former Attorney General of Guatemala; and Magistrate Judge Peggy Kuo, a former prosecutor at the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for former Yugoslavia.

The Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide (1915-23) was the deliberate and systematic destruction of the Armenian population of the Ottoman Empire during and just after World War I. It was characterized by massacres and deportations, involving forced marches under conditions designed to lead to the death of the deportees, with the total number of deaths reaching 1.5 million.

The majority of Armenian Diaspora communities were formed by the Genocide survivors.

Present-day Turkey denies the fact of the Armenian Genocide, justifying the atrocities as “deportation to secure Armenians”. Only a few Turkish intellectuals, including Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk and scholar Taner Akcam, speak openly about the necessity to recognize this crime against humanity.

The Armenian Genocide was recognized by Uruguay, Russia, France, Lithuania, Italy, 45 U.S. states, Greece, Cyprus, Lebanon, Argentina, Belgium, Austria, Wales, Switzerland, Canada, Poland, Venezuela, Chile, Bolivia, the Vatican, Luxembourg, Brazil, Germany, the Netherlands, Paraguay, Sweden, Venezuela, Slovakia, Syria, Vatican, as well as the European Parliament and the World Council of Churches.

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