California Legislature remembers Armenian Genocide victims

California Legislature remembers Armenian Genocide victims

PanARMENIAN.Net - Members of the California Legislature on Monday, April 22 commemorated the 104rd anniversary of the Armenian Genocide.

"Today Californians pause and remember the 1.5 million lives lost during the Armenian Genocide. We also acknowledge the many contributions the Armenian community has made to our nation," said Senator Scott Wilk. "The strength of the survivors and their descendants is evidenced by the leaders, innovators and thinkers of Armenian descent who have enriched our communities and thrived both here in America and throughout the world."

“Today, we remember and honor the 1.5 million souls lost during the Armenian Genocide and celebrate the strength and perseverance of our community,” stated Assembly member Adrin Nazarian. “Our community is flourishing in California yet we must remain vigilant against injustice, home and abroad.”

“April 24th is such a dark moment in world history that set in motion unspeakable horrors. Descendants and survivors of the Genocide need their family’s stories told and the tragedies to be remembered. I am honored to be in the position to add my voice to California’s appropriate commemoration and share my prayers to appreciate the Armenians in the diaspora and in Armenia” Senator Portantino (D- La Cañada Flintridge).

Armenians commemorate the mass killings on April 24 because on that date in 1915 a group of Armenian intellectuals was rounded up and assassinated in Constantinople by the Ottoman government. On April 24, Armenians worldwide will be commemorating the 104th anniversary of the Genocide which continued until 1923. Some three dozen countries, hundreds of local government bodies and international organizations have so far recognized the killings of 1.5 million Armenians as Genocide. Turkey denies to this day.

The Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide (1915-23) was the deliberate and systematic destruction of the Armenian population of the Ottoman Empire during and just after World War I. It was characterized by massacres and deportations, involving forced marches under conditions designed to lead to the death of the deportees, with the total number of deaths reaching 1.5 million.

The majority of Armenian Diaspora communities were formed by the Genocide survivors.

Present-day Turkey denies the fact of the Armenian Genocide, justifying the atrocities as “deportation to secure Armenians”. Only a few Turkish intellectuals, including Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk and scholar Taner Akcam, speak openly about the necessity to recognize this crime against humanity.

The Armenian Genocide was recognized by Uruguay, Russia, France, Lithuania, Italy, 45 U.S. states, Greece, Cyprus, Lebanon, Argentina, Belgium, Austria, Wales, Switzerland, Canada, Poland, Venezuela, Chile, Bolivia, the Vatican, Luxembourg, Brazil, Germany, the Netherlands, Paraguay, Sweden, Venezuela, Slovakia, Syria, Vatican, as well as the European Parliament and the World Council of Churches.

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