Queen Elizabeth II doesn’t want Turkey in EU for a long time

Queen Elizabeth II doesn’t want Turkey in EU for a long time

PanARMENIAN.Net - UK Labor Minister’s former girlfriend has made public what she claims is the monarch’s opinion of the expansion of the European Union.

“I was present when the Queen made a comment that was both reactionary and unconstitutionalIt was at a Christmas party at Buckingham Palace. It was mostly MPs and ex-ministers,” alleges Joan Smith, an author and broadcaster, who split up with Denis MacShane, a former Europe minister, last year, The Telegraph reports.

Smith, who refused to make a curtsy for the monarch and the Duke of Edinburgh, tells Mandrake: “Before the Queen came in, a small group of us were asked to stand in the corner and wait to be introduced. I smiled and said 'hello’ and she looked at me with almost disbelief and passed on to the next person. It was a nice Conservative MP and his wife, who, he said, was Turkish. She immediately said: 'Philip and I have been on a state visit to Turkey.’

“The woman was very polite and said how pleased people were that she had visited. Then, the Queen turned to another person in the group and said: 'The EU is getting awfully big with 28 countries.’ They said that, actually, it was 27, 'but we are hoping Turkey will come in soon’, to which the Queen said, 'Oh, we don’t want Turkey to come in for a long time.’

“I thought it was very rude. The myth is that she is above politics, so it is interesting that she would express political views like that.”

Buckingham Palace declines to comment, but a courtier tells me: “While it is not beyond the realms of possibility that Her Majesty made such a comment, it may have been taken out of context.

“The Queen has a good relationship with Turkey and Miss Smith is, I believe, a prominent republican.”

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