Reports claim Turkish prosecutors wiretapped prominent figures

Reports claim Turkish prosecutors wiretapped prominent figures

PanARMENIAN.Net - A group of anti-government Turkish prosecutors have illegally wiretapped thousands of prominent figures, pro-government media have claimed, according to BBC News.

Targets reportedly included government ministers and business leaders. The prosecutors, who are said to be loyal to U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, have denied the accusations.

Gulen has been accused of running a "parallel state" in Turkey, controlling groups of police, lawyers and politicians. He denies the claims. The latest allegations came in two pro-government newspapers, Yeni Safak and Star.

The Star reported that "Gulenists" had wiretapped more than 7,000 people since 2011 on the pretext of trying to uncover terrorism plots. One of the prosecutors named in the stories, Adem Ozcan, denied the allegations.

"There was definitely no monitoring or phone-tapping of thousands of politicians, writers, NGO representatives and businessmen in the framework of this dossier in the way that the newspaper stories say," he said in a statement.

Gulen has denied using his influence to start investigations into allegations of government corruption.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has accused Gulen, a one-time ally who lives in self-imposed exile in the U.S., of trying to attack the government. Four ministers have resigned in the aftermath of the corruption inquiries.

Erdogan has pledged to fight on, in what is seen as the biggest challenge to his government in his 11 years in office.

Related links:
 Top stories
The Russians told the United States that they should not fly U.S. warplanes in Syria, but gave no geographical information.
Because liquid water is essential to life, the finding could have major implications for the possibility of microscopic life forms on Mars.
“If our very vital and close partner ODIHR cannot observe, that we also don’t observe in Azerbaijan,” OSCE PA President said.
Azerbaijan's insistence on a restricted number of observers runs counter to the country’s OSCE commitments, an official said.
Partner news