Egypt's armed forces chief clearly hints at presidential bid

Egypt's armed forces chief clearly hints at presidential bid

PanARMENIAN.Net - Egypt's armed forces chief, Field Marshal Abdul Fattah al-Sisi, has said he cannot ignore calls by the majority for him to run for president.

According to BBC News, he was quoted by the state news agency Mena as revealing that "official procedures" regarding his candidacy were expected in the coming days.

It is the clearest indication yet that he will stand in the election which is scheduled to take place by mid-April.

Sisi led the overthrow of President Mohammed Morsi in July. The field marshal has been widely expected to resign and declare a presidential bid since the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) gave its public support at the end of January.

Field marshal Sisi commented on his prospective candidacy in a speech at a graduation ceremony at the Egyptian Military Academy in Cairo.

He said he could "not turn his back on calls by the majority of Egyptians for him to run for president", Mena reported. "Official measures should be taken in the coming days," he added.

The field marshal added that Egypt was "going through a critical phase that required unity among the people, army and police", arguing that "no party alone can help Egypt get up onto its feet in such conditions".

Officials close to the field marshal have told AFP he will step down as commander-in-chief of the armed forces and defense minister after a law regulating the presidential election is approved by Interim President Adly Mansour this week or next.

The 59-year-old former military intelligence chief was appointed to the posts by Morsi in August 2012.

But after mass protests demanding Morsi's resignation took place on the first anniversary of his taking office, it was the field marshal who gave the president an ultimatum that he would have to satisfy the public's demands or see the army step in.

When Morsi refused, Field Marshal Sisi suspended the constitution and announced the formation of a technocratic interim government.

Since then, more than 1,000 people have been killed and thousands of members of Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood have been detained in a crackdown by the interim authorities, who have designated the Islamist movement a terrorist group.

Morsi and many other senior Brotherhood leaders are currently being tried on a variety of charges, including incitement to murder and conspiring to commit terrorist acts.

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