Russia’s loss from failed satellite launches estimated at $550mln

Russia’s loss from failed satellite launches estimated at $550mln

PanARMENIAN.Net - Over the past four years the Russian government has lost nearly $550 million from uninsured failed satellite launches, the Vedomosti newspaper said Wednesday, March 12, citing an aerospace industry audit.

A letter from the Russian Association of Aviation and Space Insurers responding to a Kremlin audit said that five of the six failures among 100 launches in the past four years were of uninsured payloads, RIA Novosti reports.

Russia’s space agency is expected to submit a draft law on compulsory insurance in the space industry by the end of this year, according to the Russian government’s website.

Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin, who oversees the space and defense industries, said last week that Russia must focus on profits in the space sector to ensure a return on state investments.

The country, long a world leader in rocket construction, is a major supplier of launch vehicles for foreign payloads, but has failed to become a market contender in the lucrative satellite service and manufacturing industry.

A 2013 report by the Washington-based Satellite Industry Association said that in 2012 just 3.4 percent of the $189.5 billion in industry revenues came from launch services.

Related links:
 Top stories
French police say the search for passenger remains and debris on the mountain slopes could take another two weeks.
"I keep coming back to the fact that there is a connection between the Syrian crisis and what is happening in Ukraine," Assad said.
Investigators will also need the other black box which records flight data, information that is essential for probing air accidents.
"It's going to take a new generation of courageous conservatives to help make America great again," Cruz said.
Partner news
Soghomon Tehlirian assassinated Talaat Pasha on March 15, 1921

Operation Nemesis was a covert operation by the Armenian Revolutionary Federation carried out from 1920 to 1922, during which a number of former Ottoman political and military figures were assassinated for their role in the Armenian Genocide.