Iraqi forces withdraw from militant-held city after new offensive

Iraqi forces withdraw from militant-held city after new offensive

PanARMENIAN.Net - Iraqi forces have withdrawn from the militant-held city of Tikrit after their new offensive met heavy resistance, in a blow to the government effort to push back Sunni insurgents controlling large parts of the country, Reuters reports.

The setback came as Iraqi politicians named a moderate Sunni Islamist as speaker of parliament on Tuesday, July 15. That was a long-delayed first step towards a power-sharing government urgently needed to confront the militants, who are led by the al Qaeda offshoot Islamic State.

It is unclear if the election of Salim al-Jabouri as speaker will break the broader deadlock over Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki's bid to serve a third term. He has ruled since the April election as a caretaker.

Government troops and allied Shi'ite volunteer fighters retreated from Tikrit before sunset on Tuesday to a base four km (2.5 miles) south after coming under heavy mortar and sniper fire, a soldier who fought in the battle said.

Residents said there was no fighting on Wednesday morning in Tikrit, which lies 160 km (100 miles) north of Baghdad. It is a stronghold of ex-army officers and loyalists of executed former dictator Saddam Hussein's Baath Party who allied themselves with the Islamic State-led offensive last month.

Tuesday's military attack was launched from Awja, Saddam's birthplace some 8 km (5 miles) south of the city, but ran into heavy opposition in the southern part of the city.

Pictures published on Twitter by supporters of the Islamic State showed a fighter holding a black Islamist flag next to a black armored car it said had been abandoned by a military SWAT team, as well as vehicles painted in desert camouflage - one of them burnt out - which it said retreating troops left behind.

In the town of Dhuluiya southeast of Tikrit, where Sunni tribesmen and local police have been fighting militants for days, government forces sent from the city of Samarra pushed the militants out on Tuesday night, eyewitnesses said.

Islamic State gunmen had overrun government offices on Sunday morning and tried to take the main police station, local police and eyewitnesses said. The town is 70 km (45 miles) north of Baghdad. Residents escaped the fighting by boat on the River Tigris after militants bombed the bridge and blocked off roads leading out of the town. The destruction of the bridge also blocked the sending of reinforcements from the military base near the Shi'ite town of Balad, across the river.

Control of Dhuluiya has passed several times from local fighters and police into the hands of militants and back again.

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