Greek parliament to discuss criminalization of Genocide denial

Greek parliament to discuss criminalization of Genocide denial

PanARMENIAN.Net - Greek parliament will discuss a bill criminalizing denial of the genocides of Pontic Greeks, Armenians and those in Asia Minor at an August 26-27 sitting, Minister of Justice Charalampos Athanassiou said.

“The final edition of the law will criminalize denial of the genocides recognized by the Greek parliament, as well as Greek and international laws,” Hurriyet quoted the official as saying.

The Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide (1915-23) was the deliberate and systematic destruction of the Armenian population of the Ottoman Empire during and just after World War I. It was characterized by massacres, and deportations involving forced marches under conditions designed to lead to the death of the deportees, with the total number of deaths reaching 1.5 million.

The majority of Armenian Diaspora communities were formed by the Genocide survivors.

Present-day Turkey denies the fact of the Armenian Genocide, justifying the atrocities as “deportation to secure Armenians”. Only a few Turkish intellectuals, including Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk and scholar Taner Akcam, speak openly about the necessity to recognize this crime against humanity.

The Armenian Genocide was recognized by Uruguay, Russia, France, Lithuania, the Italian Chamber of Deputies, majority of U.S. states, parliaments of Greece, Cyprus, Argentina, Belgium and Wales, National Council of Switzerland, Chamber of Commons of Canada, Polish Sejm, Vatican, European Parliament and the World Council of Churches.

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