Turkey's responsibility is to share historical pain of Armenians: Erdogan

Turkey's responsibility is to share historical pain of Armenians: Erdogan

PanARMENIAN.Net - Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Tuesday, April 24 that it was Turkey's responsibility to share the historical pain of Armenian citizens and urged the Armenian community "to not allow others to ignite hatred over past events," Daily Sabah reports.

On Tuesday, April 24, Armenians worldwide are commemorating the 103rd anniversary of the Genocide which began in the Ottoman Empire in 1915 and continued until 1923. Some three dozen countries, hundreds of local government bodies and international organizations have so far recognized the killings of 1.5 million Armenians in the Ottoman Empire as Genocide. Turkey denies to this day.

In a message sent to the Istanbul Armenian Church for a commemoration event for Armenians who died in the Genocide, Erdogan offered condolences to the grandchildren of the Ottoman Armenians who lost their lives "during the First World War."

"It is Turkey's conscientious and ethical responsibility to share the historical pain of our Armenian citizens. We will continue to share your pain and try to resolve your problems in the future," the statement said.

Erdogan also called on the Armenian community not to allow those who are trying to ignite hatred and hostility by distorting "our shared past."

The Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide (1915-23) was the deliberate and systematic destruction of the Armenian population of the Ottoman Empire during and just after World War I. It was characterized by massacres and deportations, involving forced marches under conditions designed to lead to the death of the deportees, with the total number of deaths reaching 1.5 million.

The majority of Armenian Diaspora communities were formed by the Genocide survivors.

Present-day Turkey denies the fact of the Armenian Genocide, justifying the atrocities as “deportation to secure Armenians”. Only a few Turkish intellectuals, including Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk and scholar Taner Akcam, speak openly about the necessity to recognize this crime against humanity.

The Armenian Genocide was recognized by Uruguay, Russia, France, Lithuania, Italy, 45 U.S. states, Greece, Cyprus, Lebanon, Argentina, Belgium, Austria, Wales, Switzerland, Canada, Poland, Venezuela, Chile, Bolivia, the Vatican, Luxembourg, Brazil, Germany, the Netherlands, Paraguay, Sweden, Venezuela, Slovakia, Syria, Vatican, as well as the European Parliament and the World Council of Churches.

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