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Nine months in the Pacific

Supporting women to overcome life changing events

June 12, 2017
Nine months in the Pacific
In April 2015, four British women, the Coxless Crew team, got into a boat under the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco to start a nine-month journey across the Pacific Ocean. Before arriving in in Cairns in north-east Australia, they covered 8,446 miles to support women who have had to face adversity and overcome life changing events.

Bridge of Courageous Hearts

Tested by sledgehammers and cars

June 7, 2017
Bridge of Courageous Hearts
A 430-meter-long glass bridge was constructed across a deep canyon in China's Zhangjiajie National Forest Park and opened in summer 2016. Designed by architect Haim Dotan, the bridge is believed to be the world's longest and tallest glass pedestrian bridge. Glass panels are set into its walkway, giving visitors vertigo-inducing views and photo opportunities of the canyon below.

“Live” food

Crawling ants and wriggling fish

June 5, 2017
“Live” food
Officially stated, food is any substance consumed to provide nutritional support for an organism. It is usually of plant or animal origin, and contains essential nutrients. The substance is ingested by an organism and assimilated by the cells to provide energy, maintain life, or stimulate growth. People usually consume food of animal origin after cooking, but there are some who prefer it ‘live’. In 2007, a newspaper reported that a man from south east China claimed that eating live frogs for a month cured his intestinal problems. He also eats live mice and rats.

Child soldiers, oil and genocide

What’s happening in South Sudan

May 31, 2017
Child soldiers, oil and genocide
Tom Catena, an American physician, has been practicing in Gidel in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan since 2008. Known by locals as “Dr. Tom”, he has been on-call 24 hours a day, seven days a week at the Mother of Mercy Catholic Hospital to care for the more than 750,000 citizens of Nuba amidst ongoing civil war between the government of Sudan and the Sudanese People’s Liberation Movement. On May 28, 2017, he was announced the laureate of Aurora Prize for rekindling faith in humanity.

‘Emperor’ who ate his enemies

Cannibalism as cultural norm

May 25, 2017
‘Emperor’ who ate his enemies
Cannibalism is as old as the hills. It is the act or practice of humans eating the flesh or internal organs of other human beings. The expression cannibalism has been extended into zoology to mean one individual of a species consuming all or part of another individual of the same species as food, including sexual cannibalism. It has been both practiced and fiercely condemned in several wars, especially in Liberia and Congo. It was still practiced in Papua New Guinea as of 2012 for cultic reasons and in ritual and in war in various Melanesian tribes.

Saving lives

Courageous flight attendants

May 24, 2017
Saving lives
The life of flight attendants is often glamorized: they travel to faraway countries, get to know different people and wear a beautiful uniform. However, not everyone comprehends that this occupation is dangerous as well. Besides flying high in the sky, these slender in build young women sometimes risk their lives saving passengers.

From coca leaves to laughing gas

Evolution of anesthesia

May 15, 2017
From coca leaves to laughing gas
Attempts at producing a state of general anesthesia can be traced throughout recorded history in the writings of the ancient Sumerians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Indians, and Chinese. It is generally agreed that certain scientific discoveries in the late 18th and early 19th centuries were critical to the eventual introduction and development of modern anesthetic techniques.

Mysterious village of dwarfs

Black turtle’s curse

May 10, 2017
Mysterious village of dwarfs
The remote Chinese village known as Yangsi that has baffling scientists for decades is located in the country’s southwest Sichuan Province. It’s a very unusual place, as around 40% of its population are dwarfs, who were all born and raised there. Because of the large number of height-challenged residents, Yangsi is known as the ‘Village of Dwarfs’.

Empire built on rice

The Great Wall of China

May 2, 2017
Empire built on rice
The Great Wall of China is a series of fortifications made of stone, brick, rammed earth, wood, and other materials, generally built along an east-to-west line across the historical northern borders of China to protect the Chinese states and empires against the raids and invasions of the various nomadic groups of the Eurasian Steppe.

Church made of trees

Passion for ecclesiastical architecture

April 20, 2017
Church made of trees
There are millions of churches across the world, each of them being unique. Church architecture evolved over the two thousand years of the Christian religion, partly by innovation and partly by imitating other architectural styles as well as responding to changing beliefs, practices and local traditions. Traditional church is constructed with stones, but New Zealand can boast a real Tree Church.
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